Poetry Challenge #84: To Be or Not To Bee

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I’m no Hamlet—never played one, don’t live in one—But . . .  I do know the beginning of Prince Hamlet’s Act 3, Scene 1 Soliloquy in To Be or Not to Be. And now, if you didn’t, you do too. Thus primed, prompt on fair Prince/ess:

Poetry Challenge #84

To Be or Not to Bee

 “The verb "to be" is one of the shortest and most important—yet oddest—verbs in the English language. It is an irregular verb; indeed, it is the only verb in English that completely changes form in every tense. The verb "to be" is probably the most important verb in English.”—from “Thoughtco.” By Richard Nordquist:

Below is a list of past and present forms of the verb “to be.” And, just for fun, a fuzzy black and yellow buzzy bee. Write a Bee poem using as many forms of the verb “to be” as you can. One way to begin is to write each form of the word be on a line and take it from there.

Past and Present forms of the verb “to be”:

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I am                 I was

You are          You were

He/She/It is     He/She/It was

We are             We were

They are          They were      

And if you want to try perfect tense:  have/has/had been

Be bold! Be silly! Be—gin!

Set the timer for 7 minutes.

Start writing!

Don’t think about it too much; just do it.

*Cindy Faughnan and I began this 7-Minute Poetry Challenge 1100-ish days ago. We now take turns creating our own prompts to share with you. (This one is Cindy’s.) If you join us in the 7-Minute Poetry Challenge let us know by posting the title, a note, or if you want, the whole poem in the comments.

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Poetry Challenge #82-Diamond in the Rough

 In the same way diamonds—the “Diamonds Are A Girl’s Best Friend” gems/rocks/stones— come in many shapes, colors and sizes, diamante poems can be about anything.

Poetry Challenge #83

Diamond In the Rough

A Diamante is a diamond-shaped poem, simple as that. Diamante poems begin with a one word or syllable line. Each subsequent line grows longer by one than the previous line. The longest line is the mid-point of the poem. From there, the lines decrease by one until reaching the last one word line. The shortest Diamante has three lines of one syllable words.

Here’s a Diamante Frame if you prefer structure.

Here’s a Diamante Frame if you prefer structure.

One

Two words

One

Write a diamond-shaped Diamante about something you value.  

Set the timer for 7 minutes.

Start writing!

Don’t think about it too much; just do it.

*Cindy Faughnan and I began this 7-Minute Poetry Challenge 1100-ish days ago. We now take turns creating our own prompts to share with you. If you join us in the 7-Minute Poetry Challenge let us know by posting the title, a note, or if you want, the whole poem in the comments.

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Poetry Challenge #79-Fibonacci Awakening

Hurrah! It’s spring! Take a close look at the way the leaves on a plant and petals on a flower grow. Notice how they often grow in a pattern: One in the center; next row 2; third row 3; fourth row 5; fifth row 8 and so on. This pattern, which allows each leaf/petal to have maximum exposure to light and moisture while maintaining a tidy spiral pattern, called is the Golden Ratio, is the Fibonacci Sequence in action! Pure poetry, right! Which leads naturally to today’s prompt:

Fibonacci Sequencing Succulent

Fibonacci Sequencing Succulent

Poetry Challenge #79

Fibonacci Awakening

Number sequences are fun ways to create a form for a poem in that they pose a puzzle without too many rules. You could write a poem with using your phone number, birthday or another important date to determine the number of words or syllables on each line. For instance, this year the first day of spring is March 20th or 3202019 which would be kind of weird or maybe fun as the zeros could be stanza breaks. Get mathematical and write a poem based on the first six digits of pi: 314159, or have some spring fun with Fibonacci.

A Fibonacci sequence begins with 0 and 1. Each number is the sum of the two previous numbers. The third number would be 0+1=1. The fourth number is 1+1=2. And so on.

Write a poem matching the number of syllables or words on each line with the first six numbers in the Fibonacci sequence: 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8.

In celebration of Spring Awakening, let the theme of your poem be Springish!

Set the timer for 7 minutes.

Start writing!

Don’t think about it too much; just do it.

When you finish step outside and find the Fibonacci Busting out all over!

If the Fibonacci has you fired up for More MATH! Here’s a fab Math Challenge game!

*Cindy Faughnan and I began this 7-Minute Poetry Challenge more than 1050 days ago. We now take turns creating our own prompts to share with you. If you join us in the 7-Minute Poetry Challenge let us know by posting the title, a note, or if you want, the whole poem in the comments.

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Poetry Challenge #63-Five Books High

Do you have a pile of books? I always have a stack that I want to read. Sometimes it grows so large I’m afraid it will fall on me and hurt!

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Poetry Challenge #63

Five Books High

For this prompt, take a look at a stack of five books or five books on a shelf. Take the first word (not A or THE) and write it down. Use these words in a poem.

Here are the words from the first five books Cindy’s stack:

cool    miracle    spell    tamed    bird

And here’s the poem Cindy wrote in 7 minutes:

Watching the sun go down

was a cool miracle,

a study in pink and orange and red,

a mystical spell

that tamed the world.

And like the evening bird,

we sang one last word.
No excuses! If you don’t have a stack of books nearby, use mine!

No excuses! If you don’t have a stack of books nearby, use mine!

Set the timer for 7 minutes.

Start writing!

Don’t think about it too much; just do it.

*Cindy Faughnan (reader/reviewer extraordinaire) and I began this 7-Minute Poetry Challenge over 950 days ago. We now take turns creating our own prompts to share with you. If you join us in the 7-Minute Poetry Challenge let us know by posting the title, a note, or if you want, the whole poem in the comments.

Join the 7-Minute Poetry Challenge. Click on Fishbowl link below and sign up to receive email notifications from Kelly's blog (aka The Fishbowl)!

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Poetry Challenge #61-Riffing off Queen

If you were of listening age in the seventies go directly to the theatre to see Bohemian Rhapsody, the new biopic about Freddy Mercury and Queen. Not to give anything away (we all know Queen was a success) a high point in the movie comes when the band is plays its first stadium concert. They look out over the crowd and realize everyone in the stadium is playing-singing-performing with them!

Freddy baby totally rocking it!

Freddy baby totally rocking it!

According to the movie, this prompts Brian Mays to create songs for the audience to perform. And thus, the blockbuster anthem We Will Rock You came to be. Regardless of whether we know (or can/could ever understand) the lyrics, everyone knows the rhythm:

stomp-stomp clap/

stomp-stomp clap/

baam-baam boom!

Poetry Challenge #61

Riffing off Queen

Write a rhythmic poem about something that rocks you. Or, about a rock… or a rolling stone (if you like Dylan or the Stones better).

First, set that classic We Will Rock You rhythm in your head by actually, physically, pounding out the beat: stomp-stomp clap/stomp-stomp clap/baam-baam boom. Continue pounding out the beat as you compose each line of the poem.

Who knows, you may create another Mega-hit! At best, have fun trying.  Rock on!

Set the timer for 7 minutes.

Start writing!

Don’t think about it too much; just do it.

*Cindy Faughnan (cookie baker extraordinaire) and I began this 7-Minute Poetry Challenge over 900 days ago. We now take turns creating our own prompts to share with you. If you join us in the 7-Minute Poetry Challenge let us know by posting the title, a note, or if you want, the whole poem in the comments.

Join the 7-Minute Poetry Challenge. . . If YOU dare. Click on the Fishbowl link and sign up to receive email notifications from Kelly's blog (aka The Fishbowl)!

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Poetry Challenge #59: Terza Rima

Sometimes You Feel Like a Form…

Forms are like puzzles. You need to fit the right number of syllables or a pattern of rhyme or some other word trick into your poem and still come up with a subject. They are fun to play with—and the results can be surprising!

Poetry Challenge #59

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Terza Rima

Today’s form is the Terza Rima which means third rhyme. This form creates three line stanzas with lines of any length where the first and third line rhyme. The second line becomes the rhyme for the next stanza. Keep writing stanzas until you’re done with your poem. The last stanza should be two lines that rhyme.

If you’re better at reading rhyme scheme, it goes like this: ABA BCB CDC DED EE

Here’s an example Cindy created :

I have a hole in my left shoe
it’s growing big and wide
and now and then my toe peeks through.

It’s damp and cold when I’m outside
I cannot wear a sock
I need new shoes; these ones have died.

Rain, snow, and cold air are a shock;
they make me dance, you see.
I cannot ever take a walk.

A shopping trip with Mom would be
the best. I need a guarantee.

Your turn!

Set the timer for 7 minutes.

Start writing!

Don’t think about it too much; just do it.

*Cindy Faughnan and I began this 7-Minute Poetry Challenge over 900 days ago. We now take turns creating our own prompts to share with you. If you join us in the 7-Minute Poetry Challenge let us know by posting the title, a note, or if you want, the whole poem in the comments.

Poetry Challenge #57-One, Two, Three, GO!

Notice how sometimes the hardest part of a task—any task—(dessert aside) is starting? Like jumping off a high dive—eventually you’ve just got to take a breath and go for it!

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Poetry Challenge #57

One, Two, Three, GO!

For today’s prompt, write a poem with three words on each line. Try to write ten or more lines and see where your poem goes. If you need a starter, use: I collect…

Count those words! One, two, three, GO!

Set the timer for 7 minutes.

Start writing!

Don’t think about it too much; just do it!

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*Cindy Faughnan and I began this 7-Minute Poetry Challenge more than 900 days ago. We now take turns creating our own prompts to share with you. If you join us in the 7-Minute Poetry Challenge let us know by posting the title, a note, or if you want, the whole poem in the comments.

Join the 7-Minute Poetry Challenge. . . If YOU dare. Click on the Fishbowl link and sign up to receive email notifications from Kelly's blog (aka The Fishbowl)!

SUBSCRIBE TO THE FISHBOWL

Poetry Challenge #48-It's Hump Day!

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It’s Hump Day—WHOOOO hooooooooo.

If your hooooo, like mine, comes out less robust that’s per other days, even the Oxford Dictionary acknowledges how “Wednesday, regarded as the midpoint of a typical working week, is hump day and perhaps the toughest day of the week."

Getting up and over that Wednesday hump is such a widely shared high hurdle, there’s an International Hump Day Facebook page for folks needing  extra support. There’s even a song (and you know we love songs!) 

However, rather than wallowing in Hump Day frustration ruinination consternation, we are going to rise to the occasion and use Hump Day as a source of Inspiration:

Poetry Challenge #48

Hump Day

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Lots of things have humps. Quickly list as many as you can. Here’s a few to set you thinking:

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Hills have humps, whales have humps, camels, too—some one, some twothe Hunchback of Notre Dame had a huge hump which caused him pain, shame & ultimately fame.

Write a poem about one of the humps you listed, or the hump itself. And since the reward following the long trudge up to the end of the Wednesday is sliding through Thursday toward the weekend, bonus points if you shape your poem so it looks like a slide.

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Set the timer for 7 minutes.

Start writing!

Don’t think about it too much; just do it.

 

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For more on the history of Hump Day (and that song) read  Kelly-Lynne’s most excellent post. 

Cindy Faughnan and I began this 7-Minute Poetry Challenge at least 862 days ago. We now take turns creating our own prompts to share with you.  If you join us in the 7-Minute Poetry Challenge let us know by posting the title, a note, or if you want, the whole poem. Scroll down and click on the comments.

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